Edward Arnold

Shop by the Stars aisle featuring Edward Arnold (1890-1956) vintage movie cards, still photos, ephemera, and other collectibles.

Born Gunther Edward Arnold Schneider in New York, this character actor charmed with his boisterous chuckle throughout Hollywood's Golden Age. He fell in love with acting when he played Lorenzo in The Merchant of Venice in a production sponsored by the East Side Settlement House, and would make his professional debut soon after in 1905. As Edward Arnold he was a bit player for Ben Greet's Shakespearean repertory company and later found himself in support of both Maxine Elliott and Ethel Barrymore. He appeared in several film shorts for Essanay in Chicago in 1916-17, but his love of the stage eventually landed him on Broadway, where he was a mainstay throughout the 1920s. Arnold signed with Universal and made his feature talkie debut in Okay America! (1932). He worked his way up to leads in Diamond Jim (1935), Sutter's Gold (1936), Meet Nero Wolfe (1936), Come and Get It (1936), and was even billed over Cary Grant in The Toast of New York (1937), but the burly baritone with the infectious laugh was always best suited to supporting roles. Most fans know him best from appearances in classics such as Easy Living (1937), The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941), The Hucksters (1947), and most especially in his three appearances for director Frank Capra in You Can't Take It With You (1938), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), and Meet John Doe (1941). Arnold was President of the Screen Actors Guild in 1940-42, and published his autobiography Lorenzo Goes to Hollywood in 1940. During World War II Arnold sold war bonds and was involved with the USO. Post-war he remained active in the movies and also had a run on the radio in Mr. President from 1947-53. He was with MGM through 1950, then continued to freelance in movies while making a handful of television appearances through the time of his death at age 66. Arnold's final theatrical release was Miami Exposé (1956). In the end, whether he be playing cruel or kind, I remember Arnold best for his chuckle, the best example I can offer when defining the word guffaw.

Birthday: February 18

ABOUT THIS CARD:Film star Edward Arnold pictured on a small but thick vintage Peerless weight machine or vending...
ABOUT THIS ITEM:Vintage still photo pictures, left to right: Edward Arnold, Lynn Bari, and Warren William in promotion...
ABOUT THIS ITEM:Vintage still photo pictures Warren William and Edward Arnold in promotion of "Lillian Russell" (1940). In...
ABOUT THIS ITEM:Vintage still photo pictures Edward Arnold in promotion of "Lillian Russell" (1940). In the film Arnold...
ABOUT THIS ITEM:Vintage still photo pictures Edward Arnold in promotion of "Lillian Russell" (1940). In the film Arnold...
ABOUT THIS CARD:Vintage 1936 Gallaher "Film Episodes" tobacco card #9 Edward Arnold and Binnie Barnes in "Diamond Jim."...
ABOUT THIS CARD:Vintage 1935 Ardath "Scenes from Big Films" tobacco card #44 Ernest Truex, Una Merkel, and Edward...
ABOUT THIS CARD:Vintage 1935 Ardath "Scenes from Big Films" tobacco card #42 Edward Arnold, Ernest Truex, and Una...
ABOUT THIS ITEM:Vintage still photo shows Edward Arnold in classic pose as Diamond Jim Brady from "Diamond Jim"...
ABOUT THIS CARD:Vintage 1935 Ardath "Scenes from Big Films" tobacco card #79 Clark Gable and Edward Arnold in...
ABOUT THIS ITEM:Vintage still photo pictures Edward Arnold, probably in promotion of the classic "Mr. Smith Goes to...
ABOUT THIS ITEM:Vintage still photo pictures Edward Arnold in promotion of the classic "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington"...
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