Clara Kimball Young

Shop by the Stars aisle featuring Clara Kimball Young (1890-1960) vintage movie cards, still photos, ephemera, and other collectibles.

Mid-1910s magazine polls tabbed her most popular actress in the world, but many of what were considered Clara Kimball Young's best films are now lost, leaving her mostly forgotten. Born to show biz parents, Clara Kimball made her stage debut alongside them at age three, and continued that activity throughout her youth. The Young attached to her name after marrying actor James Young sometime before Vitagraph hired the pair in 1912. The IMDb actually credits Clara in one-reelers as early as 1909, most of those directed by Vitagraph co-founder J. Stuart Blackton. My Official Wife (1914) co-starring Earle Williams, and one of several titles directed by Clara's husband, launched Young to stardom. Late that year Young joined Lewis J. Selznick at World Film, who distributed titles such as Lola (1914) and Trilby (1915). During her association with Selznick, James Young filed a divorce suit that he ultimately won on grounds of desertion in 1919. In the meantime, Selznick formed the Clara Kimball Young Film Corporation, which released four popular films through Selznick's distribution company, all now lost. You get a better idea of the type of movies Young was doing after realizing that two of those were later remade as Constance Bennett pre-Codes (The Common Law, The Easiest Way). Young split from Selznick shortly after becoming romantically involved with Harry Garson, who produced the very popular Eyes of Youth (1919) starring Young and including Rudolph Valentino in its supporting cast. Garson began directing Young's films after this and Clara's popularity waned. She did a handful of titles for Metro through 1923, but other than a single 1925 release, Young seemed done with film. She worked in vaudeville, remarried, and finally returned in the talkies in Kept Husbands (1931). She appeared in over thirty additional films through 1941, including several Westerns, three of those starring Hoppy, William Boyd. Other talkie titles included She Married Her Boss (1935) and the 1936 Three Stooges short Ants in the Pantry. In 1956, CBS hired her as a correspondent for Johnny Carson, through I'm not sure what she actually did after her hire. Clara Kimball Young died at age seventy in 1960.

Birthday: September 6

ABOUT THIS CARD:Circa 1917-1920 movie star trading card featuring early film star Clara Kimball Young. This is an...
ABOUT THIS CARD: Vintage to circa 1916 M.J. Moriarty movie star playing card featuring silent film star CLARA...
ABOUT THIS CARD:Vintage 1920s paper-stock trading card from Spain Series A, #21 Clara Kimball (Young). Large-sized card measures...
ABOUT THIS CARD:Vintage 1920s paper-stock trading card from Spain Series A, #24 Clara Kimball (Young). Large-sized card measures...
ABOUT THIS ITEM:Vintage approximately 5-1/2" X 8" paper stock photo picturing Clara Kimball Young. This was from one...
ABOUT THIS CARD:1931 Will "Cinema Stars" 3rd Series tobacco card #17 Freeman Wood and Clara Kimball Young in...
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