Charles Boyer

Shop by the Stars aisle featuring Charles Boyer (1899-1978) vintage movie cards, still photos, ephemera, and other collectibles.

Charles Boyer debuted on both stage and screen in his native France in 1920. When he first came to Hollywood he played leads in the 1931 French-language versions of The Big House and The Trial of Mary Dugan. His first English-speaking role came in The Magnificent Lie (1931), though you more likely first saw him cavorting with Jean Harlow in Red-Headed Woman (1932). He returned to France and starred in titles including Liliom (1934) and Mayerling (1936), then came back to America and appeared with Dietrich in The Garden of Allah (1936). Boyer received the first of four Best Actor Oscar nominations for his portrayal of Napoleon opposite Garbo in Conquest (1937)—he'd also receive Academy Award nominations for Algiers (1938), Gaslight (1944), and Fanny (1961). After a couple of 1939 releases, including Love Affair, Boyer returned to France. He joined the French army when France entered World War II, but was discharged after a few months and returned again to Hollywood. The perfect romantic leading man, Boyer appeared in some of his most beloved movies during this time including All This, and Heaven Too (1940), Back Street (1941), Hold Back the Dawn (1941), and The Constant Nymph (1943). He became a US citizen in 1942, and in 1943 received an Honorary Academy Award certificate "for his progressive cultural achievement in establishing the French Research Foundation." Boyer continued to be busy in films, but also appeared in several successful Broadway productions including Don Juan in Hell, which won him a special Tony Award in 1952, and Lord Pengo, which earned him a Tony nomination in 1963. Boyer was also very involved in television as producer and sometimes star of Four Star Playhouse (1952-56), though better remembered today for his appearance in a 1956 episode of I Love Lucy. Later films included How to Steal a Million (1966) and Barefoot in the Park (1967), with A Matter of Time (1976) his final release. Boyer married actress Pat Paterson in 1934. Boyer took his own life, overdosing on Seconal two days after the death of his wife, and two days before his 79th birthday.

Birthday: August 28

ABOUT THIS ITEM:From one of the numerous 1920s and '30s sets of postcard sized cards issued by Boys...
ABOUT THIS CARD:1937 John Sinclair "Film Stars" tobacco card #37 Charles Boyer and Jean Parker. From the first...
ABOUT THIS ITEM:8" X 10" premium photo issued on a linen-like textured paper stock, dates to approximately 1935-38....
ABOUT THIS ITEM:Vintage 1930's real photo postcard featuring Charles Boyer. Measures approximately 3-1/2" X 5-1/2". "The Milton" brand,...
ABOUT THIS ITEM:8" X 10" premium photo issued on a linen-like textured paper stock, dates to approximately 1935-38....
ABOUT THIS CARD:Vintage 1950s paper-stock German trading card picturing Charles Boyer and Ingrid Bergman. Unnumbered paper-stock card with...
ABOUT THIS CARD:I never seen this issue before: circa late 1940s, possibly early 1950s "Caramelos Tio Pepote" paper-stock...
ABOUT THIS CARD:I never seen this issue before: late 1930s Carmencita "Parejas cinematogrificas" paper-stock card from Spain. To...
ABOUT THIS CARD:Vintage 1930s Editorial Bruguera "Cromos Cinefoto" paper-stock trading card #E-15-A: No. 12, Charles Boyer. Gorgeous colors...
ABOUT THIS CARD:Vintage 1930s Editorial Bruguera "Cromos Cinefoto" paper-stock trading card #E-15-B: No. 6, Charles Boyer. Gorgeous colors...
ABOUT THIS CARD:Lot of 6 different very rare trading cards from the French company La Pie Qui Chante....
ABOUT THIS CARD:Film star Charles Boyer pictured on a small but thick vintage Peerless weight machine or vending...
Showing: 1-12 of 12
Spinner